Ian Crawley
UnBecoming
I am Everywhere 
(I am Everything, I am Every Man, I am Nothing)I am Everywhere
(I am Everything, I am Every Man, I am Nothing) 
(detail)UnBecoming
Nothing In-BetweenUnBecoming
Nothing In-Between
(detail)UnBecoming
Before and After
(Diptych) (detail)UnBecoming
Before and After
(Diptych) (detail)UnBecoming
For Nick
(I Was...)UnBecoming
Cause and Effect (Diptych)UnBecoming
Between Two VoidsUnBecoming
The Second Coming (not again)UnBecoming
BecomingUnBecoming
Becoming
(detail)UnBecoming
To Know... (without words, without sound, without sight, without touch)UnBecoming
To Know... (without words, without sound, without sight, without touch)UnBecoming
This Mortal CoilUnBecoming
This Mortal CoilUnBecoming
Head, Hands and FeetFather, Mother, Son (Triptych)
(detail)Father, Mother, Son (Triptych)
(detail)Father, Mother, Son (Triptych)
(detail)Almost Nothing
UnBecoming
UnBecoming
This body of work “UnBecoming” evolved from a series of head studies. These studies were undertaken as a way of returning to the basics of drawing. Using a mirror and photographs of my head, I wanted to explore the use of traditional materials and techniques. I wanted to develop a language of mark making that got below the skin, to create a kind of portrait behind the mask. Gradually the deconstruction of the image became almost, but not entirely, erased.

Much of my inspiration came from the existential writings of authors such as Sartre, Camus, Artaud, and Beckett, etc.
I enjoyed their vivid use of metaphors using seemingly insignificant objects to describe the profound qualities of being human.

As a result I gradually started to use non-traditional materials such as wood, rope, nails and wire to re-create an image.
I was excited by the metaphorical associations each material could bring to the work. I also began to include text into the artwork to expand and compliment the artwork titles.

The work included in this exhibition documents an un-becoming; a transition from two dimensions to three dimensions and illustrates the increasing importance of “material” and “metaphor.”
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